When your followers mention or share your brand online, engaging with them poses an excellent opportunity to encourage them to refer their friends to you. Your interaction can appear on their friends’ feeds and build your reach! 

Many of your followers on social media are already fans of your brand! They are the Cheerleaders you always wanted but didn’t know you had.

Those unofficial brand ambassadors are your key to winning online.  Personal invitations from your Golfers to their social circle is key!  Try Hosting Monthly New Member/Golfer receptions or free clinics to help them promote you to their friends!

Cypress Golf Course Service (CGCS) is very aware of being sensitive to the environment. With the attention that fertilizers and pesticides golf courses use to maintain them under constant scrutiny, having a committed environmental plan by the maintenance department is essential. While there are several ways to approach the maintenance of a golf course, taking additional steps to ensure the health of the environment and the surrounding area is a practinot all management companies subscribe to.

As a partner of the Audubon Sanctuary for Golf Courses, our commitment to the environment is something that we take seriously. 

What are My Course’s Environmental Opportunities and how can CGCS help?

·    Preserve natural areas within urban environments

·    Provide needed wildlife sanctuaries

·    Support plants and wildlife native to the area

·    Protect water resources

·    Filter stormwater runoff through golf course wetlands and turfgrass

·    Rehabilitate degraded landscapes

·    Educate golfers and the general public about the nature of the game and promote environmentally-sound management

Golf Courses offer numerous opportunities to not only provide pleasant places to play, but also to protect drinking water, improve the water quality of our lakes, streams, and rivers, support a variety of plants and wildlife, and protect our environment for future generations.

If you have any questions, comments, article ideas or would like to discuss the services CGCS provides please do not hesitate to email me at scott.zakany@cgcs.com or call (941) 747-5059

Surveys conducted* by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) reveal that labor accounts for 52 percent to 65 percent of a course operation’s total budget. The surveys only generalize the relative size of this budget line item but do not reveal the challenges of the tasks themselves: the course design requirements and the relative handwork necessary to achieve them. Typically, labor costs are the primary focus for immediate cost constrictions without consideration given to the ramifications of such reductions.

The only reliable method to determine the cost of labor is to examine the tasks required of the human capital employed to execute them, individually and dynamically. Employee productivity, time and motion studies, manpower estimates: they all refer to studying tasks and the cost of labor required to complete them. 

The goal of these studies is to determine how many full-time employees (FTE) are necessary to complete all the tasks required to maintain the course objectives and benchmark standards. An FTE is defined as one person working 40 hours per week for 52 weeks for a total of 2,080 hours.  

Evaluated tasks: Actual hours
Task
Hours
Frequency
Per
Total Time per week












Task A
.75
2
week

2.25

Task B
1.25
1
day

8.75

Task C
.5
1
day

3.5

Task D
.75
2
day

10.5

Task E
.5
3
week

1.5

Task F
32
5
week

160

Task G
16
8
week

128

Task H
7
12
Day

588

Total hours per week







902.5

Total hours per year







46,930

FTE (      2080)







22.5625

When the total number of FTEs is defined for existing tasks, it should be compared to the proposed benchmarks to determine what efficiencies are lost or gained applying alternate maintenance practices and procedures. Labor costs are then assigned, per employee, to actual hours and required hours to determine where changes in the operation should be initiated and how those changes will affect labor cost projections. 

As always, maintaining the benchmark standards is the focus of all labor cost evaluations. It is important to be cognizant of manpower reductions and changes that could have a long-term negative impact on the course conditions and playability. Staff required for each task or project is frequently misrepresented because the exact time requirements are estimated or unknown. Staff is often expected to do more, with fewer resources, or experiences idleness as a result of undefined expectations.

Labor cost is a significant portion of any club’s budget, and course maintenance accounts for the majority of that cost. Course maintenance is also the most visible and impactful for membership, both in terms of aesthetics and enjoyment. Additionally, what works for one club may not work for another, even clubs that are similar in geography or player demographics; no two clubs can compare or duplicate labor utilization and cost.

The principles at CGCS have the expertise to complete a proper labor analysis, having personally owned, operated, and managed course operations. We provide the solutions you need to manage maintenance operations as a business within your business. If you would like more information about this type of analysis, or any other service that will allow your club to run more efficiently and more profitably, call us at (813) 645-9111 or send an email from our contact page.

Cypress Golf Management’s course maintenance subsidiary Cypress Golf Course Services (CGCS) signs another deal in the wonderful state of Georgia. Dekalb County GA and CGCS have signed a 5 year deal to oversee the renovation and ongoing maintenance of the Sugar Creek Golf Course located in Panthersville, Georgia. The facility consists of an 18 hole golf course, clubhouse, driving range and tennis courts.

The course was built in 1976 and has been closed for almost two years and will be undergoing many improvements to include renovating greens and bunkers, driving range, tree work, replacing and repairing bridges around the course and cart path repairs. Cypress will oversee the renovations and manage the course when it is ready to be opened to the public.

“Scott Zakany head of CGCS and Cypress President John Fogel worked for over a year on this contract and are happy to see the details finally falling into place. The Dekalb County staff has been very diligent and great to work with. We look forward to making Sugar Creek a gem for Dekalb county and their citizen to play” said Cypress CEO Bill Stine.  Renovations on the property are set to begin soon.

Golf Course Maintenance Costs

Over the past 5 years I cannot tell you how many times I have been asked by a club official, “how can I lower my expenses at my club without sacrificing quality”? More often times than not, my response to that question is “are you efficient in all aspects of your operation and is that communicated that to you by your golf course superintendent”?

While I know that this is answering a question with another question, it makes the club official realize that they may not have all the answers.

I came across an interesting article a while back called “Is it time to Re-think Maintenance Budgets”? What I can tell you about that article is that it touches on many areas of a maintenance operation, of which, the most significant area that states: “So, what can a golf course Owner/Manager or Board of Directors do to control costs?” Read more

In most areas that we are working in, we have been experiencing a dryer than average year and increased needs for irrigation. Whether your course is getting natural occurring irrigation (rain water) or having to supplement the rainfall with irrigation, applying the correct amount of irrigation is one of the toughest jobs that a superintendent has to face.
Overwatering occurs for many reasons but one of the biggest is the fear of getting too dry and the tendency is to keep it wet. A great water source and well-drained soils can usually tolerate this a lot more than a course with poor water quality such as a secondary treatment facility or well water that is high in salt. The down side is that nothing good comes out of overwatering golf courses, especially the putting surfaces. Read more